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Florence Welch’s Life In Recovery

Florence Welch’s Life In Recovery

Written by: stodzy | Date: June 1, 2016

The image of the rock star or performer getting drunk or high and trashing their hotel room post-show is a stereotype that has merit. In the glory days of rock and roll such behavior was almost a prerequisite, and if you weren’t raising some sort of fuss, you weren’t doing it right.

While there is still plenty of that going on no doubt, today people often see these things as signs of a problem to be solved, not a sign of artistic success.

Case in point: Florence Welch of the acclaimed British band Florence and the Machine didn’t quite trash the hotel room in the traditional sense, but she did cause some damage — that could have been much worse.

She relays that she’d been drinking heavily, torn her dress and chipped a tooth before passing out. She woke to a smoky, singed room. She’d left a cinnamon tea light burning.

The story caught attention from the media, naturally. Welch had described her experience with drinking as a downward spiral that began in part due to her sudden success. This isn’t uncommon. Although Welch had an interesting and accomplished life before her fame, for the most part, her life had been “normal.” She was rapidly thrust into the world of parties and touring and performing. She confessed that she drank before shows.

Before turning thirty, she decided she’d had enough of the increasingly destructive cycle of drinking. She wanted to live a healthier lifestyle, connect better with her audience and lead a happier life overall. She committed herself to sobriety and hasn’t looked back.

Fame And Substance Abuse

While fame certainly has its upsides, there is a dark side as well. Many people do not realize the level of loneliness that often comes with the lifestyle of a touring performer. People on the road are often going months without seeing their families or old friends and are often surrounded by surface-level relationships with people who don’t always have their best interests at heart.

For some people, the allure of parties and excess helps fill the void that is left when they are removed from their normal life. Alcohol and drugs become a way to pass the time, calm jangled nerves, soothe loneliness and stress. Addiction among the music community is common. Although many people chalk it up to the hazards of being talented and creative, it’s important to realize that abusing substances is not a prerequisite of the artistic lifestyle, and it’s more likely that the rigors of fame and the demands of a non-stop lifestyle take their toll.

What’s Life Like Now?

Like many women who have recovered from alcohol or drug use, it appears that Florence is getting to know herself, exploring her inner landscape and enjoying a more healthy lifestyle.

For Welch, it seems the key is balance. Balancing art, work, fun and life in general, isn’t easy no matter who you are. It’s not just the famous who struggle with this. It’s so easy to be consumed with excess and chaos. For those who have struggled with alcohol or drugs, things like relationships, stress or even lack of sleep can be triggers.

Getting Help For Addiction

If you are a woman struggling with drug or alcohol addiction, Wayside House offers a treatment program that can help. Women experience addiction differently than men and experience challenges that are unique to women only. Unfortunately, many treatment centers are more geared toward men. In other words, women are “fit” into addiction treatment that was primarily designed for male clients. A women’s program not only provides a safe, welcoming environment but also tailors its program to specifically address the needs of women in recovery.

Wayside House offers specialized treatments and therapies that are typically only found in more expensive treatment centers. Examples include equine therapy, horticulture therapy, art and music therapy and treatment for dual diagnosis. If you are tired and ready for a change, Wayside House can help. Call 800-655-0817 to talk to someone today.